1. "What more do you need?" (Modacrylic wigs, 1970)

    "What more do you need?" (Modacrylic wigs, 1970)

    (Source: adsausage)

  2. Poetry is the weak sister of its sibling arts, alternately ignored and swaddled like a 19th-century invalid.

    — Lovely David Orr review of—surprisingly—James Franco.

  3. School is out for the summer. The sun is beating down on Israel and Gaza. Kids are growing restless. So that they don’t have to pay with their lives for a game of hide-and-seek on a beach, so that they don’t have to duck for cover every time a siren sounds, all eyes should turn to Gaza in hopes that this conflict finally comes to an end.

    — 

    Ruth Margalit on the children of Gaza and Israel: http://nyr.kr/1u0xika (via newyorker)

    My post in The New Yorker.

  4. The relationship between the two peoples was hardly that of equals. It had a colonial quality not unlike that along much of the American border with Mexico. But when the guy repairing your balcony did not show up for work because of a closure of the West Bank and could not earn his pay, his deprivation meant something to you, as an Israeli. You knew him; you trusted him; you knew about his family. And when you, a Palestinian worker, saw your Israeli employer’s mother growing ill, you understood his anguish. You knew the woman; you liked her. 

    […]

    Israelis — especially in the heartland around Tel Aviv, where two-thirds of the country lives — can now go weeks without laying eyes on a Palestinian or ever having to think about one. In Gaza, Israelis do not exist except in a kind of collective nightmare. In the West Bank, the Israelis are mostly settlers and soldiers. Apart from a few pockets of industry and shopping where Palestinians are employed, interaction is highly limited.

    Ethan Bronner on the growing separation between Israelis and Palestinians, and its role in the current escalation.

  5. WARNING
Side-effect of reading Knausgaard: wanting to pack up and move to Tveit, Norway (pictured here).

    WARNING

    Side-effect of reading Knausgaard: wanting to pack up and move to Tveit, Norway (pictured here).

  6. The Beyoncélogues. A piece of brilliance on a gloomy day. Watch.

  7. (Source: realizes)

  8. "What hurts so bad about youth isn’t the actual butt whippings the world delivers. It’s the stupid hopes playacting like certainties." 

    "What hurts so bad about youth isn’t the actual butt whippings the world delivers. It’s the stupid hopes playacting like certainties." 

  9. I wrote about the real jail behind “Orange Is the New Black.” (Spoiler alert: overflowing sewage, “ping pong toilets,” brown drinking water, black mold, rodent infestations.)

  10. I haven’t even bought the book yet and already I’m weirdly obsessed. It’s called Fictitious Dishes and, in it, designer—and self-described “table-setter”—Dinah Fried reconstructs literary meals as detailed by their authors.

    Top photograph is from the Bell Jar. (“Then I tackled the avocado and crabmeat salad…Every Sunday my grandfather used to bring me an avocado pear hidden at the bottom of his briefcase under six soiled shirts and the Sunday comic.”)

    Bottom, fromCatcher in the Rye. (“When I’m out somewhere, I generally just eat a Swiss cheese sandwich and a malted milk. It isn’t much, but you get quite a lot of vitamins in the malted milk.”)

    Here’s more from this delicious-sounding book.